What is the Best Age to Start Archery?

Archery has become one of the fastest growing sports as people of all ages flock to learn a skill that seems to be featured in most of the current blockbuster movies. The sport is a perfect mix of ancient instinct, muscle memory conditioner and the coolest pop culture phenomenon.
The good news for anyone who has a child keen to become the next Katniss Evergreen or Legolas, is archery classes and clubs are easily accessible to anyone living close to a main urban or rural area. Other activities and places that may have archery on the curriculum are your local scouts, private school, summer camp or bowhunting enthusiasts group.

What is the Best Age to Start Learning Archery?

If a parent wants the family to learn archery together or if you have a child pestering for a lesson it is reassuring to know that there really is no age barrier to trying out the sport. All that is needed for some gains to be had is a small amount of discipline and fitness.
For a kid to get the most benefit from a lesson and have fun into the bargain, it is a good thing to ascertain if your child can listen to a little coaching. It is vital that they pay attention to the teacher’s safety tips and will attend a few lessons regularly in the beginning so that the techniques become well practiced.
What is so beneficial about a child learning a new sport is that it can be a bonding experience. They can get out, meet new people, and have a unique encounter that they will remember forever. It is a good thing to start your child out in the sport of archery as it is a stand-alone sport with no real competitiveness at the start – this will give he or she the chance to learn without pressure from another’s size or weight impeding their confidence levels.
The earlier your son or daughter can begin to learn the stance, techniques and equipment functionality, the earlier they can start to feel comfortable in the archery environment. There are child-size bows available to buy online but until the passion to make archery a long-time pursuit kicks in it is probably easier to use the bows provided by your local archery club.

The Benefits of Attending Classes at Your Local Archery Club

A visit to your local archery club will help you, and whichever family member who wants to learn the sport, see the action in real life without a full-on commitment. There you will discover many people who are devoted to archery and can answer any questions you may have. Archers are passionate about the sport and will gladly help out by providing more information.
There are places in some communities that host youth instructional leagues. There may be one close to you that offers archery lessons with certified instructors on hand to guide the beginner archer. They are particularly good at inspiring children to take the first steps in archery practice.

Why Choose Archery as a Sport for Your Child or Yourself?

According to statistics, archery is safer and more protected than every other ball sport offered by schools – except maybe ones like table tennis or bowls! It is available as both an indoor and an outdoor activity all year round which makes it perfect for anyone living in countries prone to extreme weather conditions.
Archery is more than just a passing fad – it’s a sport that is growing globally: one out of 12 people participate in it and it was the most watched sport in the 2012 London Olympics. It’s more than simply standing in front of a target and shooting arrows because it teaches many other things too; a child is never too young to learn some of the skills archery can teach.
If you feel that your child is old enough to learn solid life lessons such as persistence, confidence and patience, then it is probably time for them to attend an archery lesson.
Archery is a very structured sport placed in a fun environment so children benefit from the exciting atmosphere as well as the disciplined techniques. This is a winning combination for a child to experience.
Young people learn to wait their turn, listen to and follow directions, set their own goals and challenge themselves. These instructions help build a child’s character, something that the child can benefit from for the rest of their life.
On top of being a brag-worthy activity any child would be proud to say they participate in, archery brings a lot to the table when discussing better balance and co-ordination skills. Drawing a bow far back enough to hit a target strengthens the muscles in the arms and the core of the torso. This improves posture, balance and stability. Hand-eye coordination is sharpened and the child’s muscle memory is developed.

All of these points are solid reasons to allow your child to start learning and participating in the noble sport of archery from the time the first watch “The Hunger Games” and say that is what they would like to do. The confidence levels of any youngster attending archery classes scores very high.
Another reason parents are happy to allow their children to learn archery is that it is a good sport for boys and girls, men and women – the entire family can attend classes. Whether it is a group activity or a special hobby one member of the family chooses to do on their own, archery is an accessible sport.
What many children find instantly appealing when first trying the sport out is the cool kit that comes with it. Kids can customise their belts and bags and the bows are available in a variety of colors and choices. This personalization of the kit is what stands archery out from other sports.
Added to this attractive child-friendliness is the bonus of Vitamin D being absorbed during outside tournaments, a good physique being formed and up to 5 miles (8kms) being walked during an average tournament, and you can see that anyone will score big healthy points for attending archery lessons.

What Type of Bow Should a Beginner Use…Compound or Recurve?

When first dipping a toe into the compelling sport of archery, it’s better to use or hire your equipment at the club or group where you are learning for the first few lessons. Once the archery bug has truly bitten and you have decided that this mentally and physically fascinating pursuit is for you, then it is time to start looking into buying a bow of your own.

Archery is one of the few sports where the hobbyist gets to personalize their kit. Your first bow purchase should always be guided by the “suitable for you” factor rather than the “it looks so cool” factor. With this in mind, let’s look at the main key points that any beginner archer should bear in mind while on the hunt for a bow.

What Style of Archery Are You Interested In?

Archery is a very flexible sport – it can take place indoors or outside, in the wilderness or at your neighborhood range – any beginner should consider the convenience of traveling to an archery gathering that is the closest to them.

Next, discover which style of archery is practiced there. If the style of archery offered at the club is not what you are looking for, then you can widen the field of proximity.

There are five archery types:
• Target Archery
• Field Archery
• 3D Archery
• Traditional
• Bowhunting

And there are 4 types of bows:
• Recurve Bows
• Compound Bows
• Traditional Bows
• Crossbows

If mastering the art of bowmanship is one of your goals, we can take crossbows off the table. This type of modified bow is used in all the archery styles except traditional, but their high accuracy and long firing range do not make them a good fit for a beginner keen to learn archery basics.

Beginner archers should postpone buying a traditional or longbow until they have mastered the basic archery principles. Once entry-level archery has been mastered (usually taking around 12 lessons), core strength has built up and muscle memory has developed, then the novice archer can try out other bow types.

That leaves the recurve bow and the compound bow for the selection of the beginner.

Recurve Bows

If you are a fan of watching archery at the Olympics then you will recognize the Recurve Bow. It is the only bow allowed in the Olympics and makes its appearance in more than a few blockbuster movies too.

Recurve Bows have two small dipping arms that curve away from the archer at the end of the curving bow branch – hence its name. This double curve gives the arrow more power.

Compound Bows

A Compound Bow does not resemble the bow of popular culture; it looks more mechanical and futuristic. It derives its name from the little wheels at the end of the of the bow arms, called cams. These wheels work in tandem with the string to compound the energy generated when the bow is drawn.
This is a really handy mechanism enables the Compound Bow to be fully drawn but the archer does not have to withhold all the force that is stored in the bow. When the string is released, the cams unwind and propel the string faster than the initial holding weight. This is called “let off”.

Compound or Recurve – Which Bow is Best for the Beginner?

The entry-level lessons at any archery club will focus on the basic steps of how to use the equipment, your stance, and how to hit the target. Once these essentials have been mastered and a personal bow is your next step, first listen to the advice of your teacher, classmates, and seasoned experts.
Any teacher of archery will recommend the beginner start off learning with a recurve bow. There is ample proof that if a beginner archer uses a recurve, they will go on to become the better archer. The reasons for this are numerous.

The recurve bow provides much more information to the beginner and instructor. This “feedback” allows the participants to identify any flaws in their form and technique. The identification of initial problems can then be better gauged and addressed by the instructor.

The compound bow and the beginner using one can have the effect of covering up any minor or major flaws in such techniques as drawing and release. These executions (especially the release mechanism) must be done correctly from the start in order for the beginner to lay a solid foundation on which to learn.

This is when the beginner should take on board the instructor’s suggestions and guidance before buying their own bow; they may insist upon the use or purchase of a recurve. Once the entry level archer can no longer be termed an absolute beginner (at least 12 or more lessons are needed) then the choice between a recurve or compound bow can be resolved by the new archer.

The specific skills learned using a recurve bow accelerate the awareness of motor skills and control needed for a beginner in a shorter amount of time. If archery domination and proficiency is your ultimate goal, learning on a recurve bow should be your only choice. Archers who have learned on a recurve shoot higher scores and win more medals.

It may require more control and motor skills learning on a recurve bow rather than a compound, but the end results are stellar. If the student struggles to learn on a recurve, the instructor may switch them to a compound simply because they prefer the learner to carry on with their lessons and have fun rather than lose interest in the sport because of the difficulties in mastering a recurve.

In closing, some beginners are not successful (or happy) learning on a recurve bow and if this is the case, the swap to a compound bow is more desirable rather than letting the student struggle with the recurve. The aim of any beginner should be to enjoy the experience first and worry about choices later!

What do the Numbers on a Recurve Bow Mean?

The bow is a beautiful thing. It represents human evolution, physics, technology and art within its curves and structure. It’s also the key to learning one of the fastest growing and most popular sports – archery. Unfortunately, bow terminology can seem to be really complex to the beginner archer. This article aims to help you decipher some of the specs and descriptions bow manufacturers use so that you can better spend your energies on perfecting your technique.

Specs can look something like this for a small child’s beginner bow –

Draw length: 61 cm/24”
Draw weight: 15 lbs/6.8 kgs (sometimes written “15#”)
Speed: 75 fps
Length: 110 cm/43.3”

Draw Length

The draw length tells you how far back a bow can be pulled. It varies from person to person, according to their build. There are some bows on the market that offer a variety of draw lengths to be adjusted by the user.
It is best to visit an archery retailer or ask your instructor to measure your correct draw length professionally before a bow is fitted. Your local archery club will also be able to help size up your draw length.
This measurement determines the size and length of the arrows your bow will use and the size/length of the bow.
Archers come is many sizes and age groups so a general rule of thumb to match recurve bow length to the person’s draw length is to follow the guidelines below:
Draw Length worked out by professional Bow Size/Length
Up to 25”/63 cm 54”/137 cm to 62”/157 cm
Up to 27”/68 cm 64”/162,5 cm to 66”/167.6 cm
Up to 29”/73,6 cm 66”/167,6 cm to 68”/172,7 cm
Or:
Age: 6 to 12 years – smaller size bows of 54”/137 cm to larger size bows of 64”/162,5 cm
Age: Teen to adult – smaller size bows of 64”/162,5 cm to larger size bows of 70”/177,8 cm

Draw Weight

This signifies the amount of force the archer needs to pull the bow. Draw weight is always measured in pounds although metrified countries may have added a kilogram translation. Sometimes the pound is written as a hashtag # sign on the labeling.
A recurve bow’s draw weight will increase as it is drawn but a compound bow’s weight will not.
A quick assessment of the learner’s body weight, gender and general fitness levels help work out their draw weight capabilities. Keeping in mind that beginners always place lower draw weights.
Small child (70 to 100 pounds/31 to 45 kilograms) – 10 to 15 pounds/4,5 to 6,8 kilograms suggested draw weight.
Larger size child (100 to 130lbs/59 kilograms) – 15 to 25 pounds/11 kilograms suggested draw weight.
Petite female & medium size female – 25 to 35 pounds/15,8 kilograms suggested draw weight.
Small frame male – 30 to 45 pounds/ 13 to 20 kilograms suggested draw weight.
Medium frame male – 40 to 55 pounds/ 20 to 25 kilograms suggested draw weight.

Speed

Speed refers to how many feet the arrow travels per second (fps). The higher the fps, the faster the bow’s capabilities. A few bow makers use ATA as a speed guideline but the majority use IBO speed guidelines. A beginner’s recommended speeds will be low in the beginning.

The Bow’s Size / Length

The length of a bow is measured from the axle at one end to the other axle (where the bow limbs connect to the cams/wheels) on a compound bow and from the string groove to the opposite string groove on an unstrung recurve bow. A bow must be in proportion to its user and this will help guide anyone wanting to find a specific size/ length.

Bows come in larger and smaller sizes than the ones above, but these specs are generalized for possible entry-level ages and sizes.
The best advice for any new archer being fitted for their first bow is to ask your coach or local archery expert to help with measuring you. Any serious learner will not buy their first bow sight and fit unseen. The bow must be slightly shorter than the person buying it. A good bow fit determines how well you will handle your first few lessons.

What is the Most Durable Material for an Arrow?

Basically, durability refers to how long something is going to last in the field or how much use it can withstand until it wears out. The material that makes an arrow defines its durability. As an entry-level archer, you can rely on your local archery retailer or instructor to advise you in choosing the correct arrows, but this to speed up the process, here are some of the choices that you may be guided towards.

Authentic Wooden Arrows

These are the arrows that the CGI in movies like “300”, Gladiator and Lord of the Rings would have you believe swarm over the horizon like millions of malevolent wasps during a battle.
Arrows were very time consuming to make in the olden days. Manufacturing was handed over to experts called “fletchers” early on. Lower quality arrows were used for the volley attacks that are shown in film, because they were less accurate, but were they ever fired in such large amounts?
Herodotus recounts in his history the Spartans received word that the Persians released arrows in such large amounts that they darkened the sky, so the stories of huge quantities of arrows being made for war are true.
For anyone interested in old-school-style archery, shooting wooden arrows are the only way to go. These are the go-to favorites of traditional bowhunters and archers.
For a real artisanal flair, it is possible to make wooden arrows yourself. This will be a real labor of love as the wood shaping, feather fletching and barb cresting take patience and skill to implement. If buying them, they are inexpensive and accessible.
Whether your wooden arrows are bought or home-made, they are prone to break or warp with limited durability. They are suitable for longbows and recurve bows only.

Fiberglass Arrows

Fiberglass arrows will be well known to anyone who spent time at an archery group program or youth camp. They are the favorites of these institutions because of their low cost, variety of lengths and reasonable reliability.
They are a perfect fit for any entry-level archer who wants to get to know the sport a bit before committing to a more expensive or high-tech arrow type. They come ready-made in consistent batches from any retailer specializing in sports gear.
The uniformity of fiberglass arrows makes them impossible to customize and they can be prone to splintering. This doesn’t mean you will get a splinter in your finger – it means that there have been reports of the arrows fracturing on use. This is a key point in their durability/safety.
The fiberglass arrow is heavier and this will impact their accuracy when used to hit targets at longer distances. This is not a main concern of a beginner though. They are suitable for recurve bows only.

Aluminum Arrows

Aluminum arrows are a great choice for the archer who has mastered archery basics and wants to start building their own kit.
Aluminum is accurate for up to 18 meters (19,8 yards) and further – these are competition distances. They have superb durability and straightness and can be customized for length, diameter and rigidity (called spine in archery). This makes them perfect for a first foray into competitive archery without costing the earth.
Your nearest archery store can custom-make aluminum arrows for you to your unique specifications. They can also be personalized with your choice of fletching color.
These arrows have the drawback of bending (called canoeing, because they follow the shape of a canoe) if they are hit by another arrow and they are costlier than fiberglass and wood arrows. They are suitable for compound bows and recurve bows.

Carbon Arrows

If a reasonably priced arrow with good durability is what you seek, once you have a few lessons under your belt, then carbon arrows may be a good fit for you. They have excellent accuracy when flying out of recurves and will not break the bank for someone seeking out a mid-priced arrow for competitions.
The carbon shafts are uniformly straight which improve accuracy. The rigidity (spine) and diameter options can be custom sized as can the fletching and wraps. Carbon arrows’ durability is solid but they are still very fast and lightweight.
On the negative side, carbon arrows can splinter and this may not just shock but also hurt the archer.

Composite Arrows

These arrows are better for any archer using a long-distance recurve bow or a compound bow. They are what Olympic Champions choose to use and get their name from an aluminum and carbon composite. They have the best uniformity of the spined arrows and shoot straightest.
Like anyone would expect from Olympic competition standard arrows, they offer customized sizing, diameter and rigidity (spine) options. They are the highest quality and would be wasted on anything other than long-distance shooting, whether indoors or outdoors.
With all of these considerable advantages: durability; accuracy; rarely breaking or splintering – the one concern is the composite arrows’ price point. They are expensive and you can lose them just as easily as any other kind of arrow. They have been known to break but with less splintering.
Composite arrows should only be bought from an experienced retailer or with the help of a coach/instructor. They will know how to match the right spine choice to the correct bow. As cool as they are, they are recommended for the advanced/serious archer’s use only.

Durability is important because a damaged arrow can be dangerous. Things that can affect an arrows durability is improper handling or transport, impacting with another arrow, and continual reuse. Always inspect an arrow carefully before using it.

How do I Choose Arrows for a Recurve Bow?

The best way to learn archery as a beginner is to use a recurve bow. The reason being, according to top archery coaches, is that it provides more feedback on a physical level to both coach and learner. Any flaws in the beginner’s stance, technique, or form can be better seen and felt when holding a recurve bow. The coach is then able to nip bad habits in the bud before they take hold in the new archer’s muscle memory. The only exception to this is if the new archer would rather give up the sport altogether than deal with the more difficult aspects of recurve bow use. Compound bows have been invented for a reason; they are easier to use and assist the archer’s pull and release motions. It is way more important to enjoy archery lessons and learn on a compound bow than it is to struggle on with a recurve. But new archers who take their first lessons on recurve bows do become better archers.

The Best Way to Choose Arrows for a Recurve Bow

There are many types of arrows on the market and choosing the right one for your recurve bow is quite a selection process. As arrows are the objects that go ahead and hit the target, it can be said they are more important than even the bow. Knowing that, it is just as important to invest in quality arrows as it is to buy the best bow for you.

Arrows 101

The Shaft: This is the part of the arrow that looks like a pencil shaft. It is important to make sure the shaft has the correct amount of “spine” or bend resistance. The shaft part of the arrow actually bends before it is released and straightens. The wrong amount of spine in your arrow will cause it to have an erratic flight path.

The Fletching: Fletching is an ancient specialist art with its own lingo. It refers to the plastic or feather part of the arrow’s tail end. Even rockets have wings to provide them with stability in flight and accuracy at the destination and fletching does the same for arrows. One of the plastic rudders or feathers at the end of the arrow will be a different colour: this is called the “cock” and the remaining colours are called “hens”. There are always 3 or more of them.
Feather fletchings are used for indoor archery and plastic vanes/fletchings are used outside because they are waterproof.
The Arrowhead: The tip of the arrow. Its point is the part that has to pierce the target so each arrowhead variety has its own purpose and advantages.

The Nock: Looking closely at the arrow, you can see a plastic tip above the fletching that is designed to hold the arrow on the bowstring – this is called the nock. It connects with the bowstring at the nocking point which can be shifted slightly up or down according to the desired trajectory.

To learn more about different arrow types, materials they are made of and durability, click here.

Arrow Specifics

Grain: Arrow weight is called the grain. Every arrow type and make will have a different grain. If using a lighter arrow is needed for your recurve bow then buy arrows with the same length spine your draw length requires but choose a lighter grain.
An arrow with a perfect weight will fly straight and true. If it is too light then the target may not be penetrated. If it is too heavy, the arrow will have a downward trajectory.

Tips: There are a huge variety of arrowhead tips on the market and each have their own capabilities. Field tips are mainly used to hunt small game and target archery. Then there are broadheads which cause serious damage in any target. On top of field tips, there are two arrowhead types called blunts and judos which are used in the hunting of smaller game.
An archery game similar to paint balling is used with arrowheads called LARPs. These are foam tip arrowheads inserted over arrows so that they can be aimed and shot at people.

Correct Size Nocks: Nocks come in different types and sizes. If you buy a certain brand of arrow, check to see if they support other makes of nock or if you will need to stay within the brand.
• Pin nocks are standardized and fitted on to an aluminum pin at the end of the shaft. It is there to protect your arrow from damage if another arrow hits it from behind.
• Over-nocks come in different sized according to which company has produced them. They slide on to the shaft so its diameter must fit the arrow’s.
• Conventional nocks are aluminum cones glued to the tail of the arrow. They must also be bought to fit the diameter of the arrows you use.
• Press-fit nocks have to be the correct diameter for the arrow shaft and they slide on and stay once pressure is applied.

The Arrow Spine

When measuring the arrow stiffness (spine), it is a good gauge to ensure your arrow’s stiffness goes up the higher your draw weight is (click here for link to draw weights).
If this is mismatched, your arrow will either flop or bend too much to be able to propel off the bowstring. Every arrow brand has different spine charts.

When shooting your recurve bow make sure the coloured vane or fletch part of your arrow is pointed between your arm and the grip section of the bow (riser). This is will improve your accuracy which is every archer’s ultimate goal.

What Length Bowstring Do I Need for My Recurve Bow?

It is necessary to replace the bow strings on your recurve bow as often as needs be. This depends on how frequently you shoot with your bow, what environment you are shooting in and how well your bow is maintained and stored after use.

It is also important to get a bowstring of the correct length when the time comes around to replace it, as an incorrect bowstring length doesn’t just lead to frustration, but can lead to you damaging the bow and even yourself.

In our current culture of buying online, it is always good to read a bit about what the information is that you will see on the screen when looking to buy a bowstring, and what that terminology means.

How to Measure the Bowstring on Your Recurve Bow

  • First, unstring your bow and lay it on flat, level ground
  • Using a measuring tape, measure the distances between the 2 tips of your recurve bow
  • The correct length for your recurve’s new bowstring is 4 inches (10,16 cms) less than the distance measured from one tip to the other.
  • Confirm the distance that was measured by waiting 24 hours for your old bowstring to return to its original length
  • Loop the old bowstring end around an anchor like a nail and extend the bowstring out so that it is rigid and tight
  • Then measure the size of the old bowstring with your measuring tape again

Look at Your Recurve Bow Itself

Sometimes there will be writing at the bottom limb of your recurve bow, although it can often be on the side part of the riser too. The writing will typically read 58”/30# and that refers to the length of your bow (58” or 147,32 cms)/and the poundage of 30# at a draw length of 28” or 71,12 cms.  (Learn more about draw length)

If your recurve is 58” you may think that you then require a 58 inches AMO (Archery Manufacturers Association) bowstring. AMO measurements for bowstrings have set the actual string length to be 4” less so the 58 inches AMO string you buy is actually only 54 inches.

This is a very important point to remember as there are, confusingly, some places that label their string orders based on the string’s actual length and not the AMO regulation sizes.

So, if the bow specs on the bottom limb reads 60” than you must get a 60 AMO bowstring once you have checked that the AMO standard is the one used by the string manufacturer. The same thing goes if you measure your bow from tip to tip. You take that measurement and buy the AMO bowstring length to match it.

More Bowstring Information

Standard bowstrings are made from such hardy materials like B50-Dacron (or Dracrogen). This has a little stretch and provides solid shooting with a helpful leeway to the archer and the bow.

They are suitable for the recurve bow of an entry level archer all the up to competition level.

When selecting a standard recurve bowstring, first look at the draw weight for your bow.  (Learn more about draw weight). Next, choose the number of strands the string has that will be a good match to the draw weight of your recurve.

 

A standard B50 Dacron/Dacrogen string are generally selected by using the following method:

  1. A 10 strand B50 Dacron/8 strand Dacrogen string is for bows that are up to 30 pounds/13,5 kgs.
  2. A 12 strand B50 Dacron/10 strand Dacrogen string is for bows up to 40 pounds/18,1 kgs.
  3. A 14 strand B50 Dacron/12 strand Dacrogen string is for bows heavier than 40 pounds/18,1 kgs.

 

The more strands a bowstring has, the heavier and stronger it is. The thickness of the string will change as more strands are added, so the fit of your bow’s arrow nock will be affected by the thicknesses. Either a nock that is smaller or a fatter string may be needed for a beginner archer’s arrows to fit well with the entry level 10-strand B50 string. A 12-strand B50 string is most commonly used, as it gives a good balance between the strength, weight, nock fit, and size.

Larger size strings are mostly used for heavier bows where the added weight of the string will act as a small damper, which in turn makes shooting with a heavier bow more consistent. There may, however, be a loss of distance. A bigger string groove on the nock may also be needed.

 

These archery facts and knowledge will become more familiar to you as you practice and integrate with the sport. When in doubt, it is always best to ask your coach or another archery expert to help you understand. Once you are comfortable with the terminology, feel free to shop online for all your archery equipment.

 

Draw Length

The draw length tells you how far back a bow can be pulled. It varies from person to person, according to their build. There are some bows on the market that offer a variety of draw lengths to be adjusted by the user.

It is best to visit an archery retailer or ask your instructor to measure your correct draw length professionally before a bow is fitted. Your local archery club will also be able to help size up your draw length.

This measurement determines the size and length of the arrows your bow will use and the size/length of the bow.

Archers come is many sizes and age groups so a general rule of thumb to match recurve bow length to the person’s draw length is to follow the guidelines below:

Draw Length worked out by professional                       Bow Size/Length

Up to 25”/63 cm                                                             54”/137 cm to 62”/157 cm

Up to 27”/68 cm                                                             64”/162,5 cm to 66”/167.6 cm

Up to 29”/73,6 cm                                                          66”/167,6 cm to 68”/172,7 cm

Or:

Age: 6 to 12 years – smaller size bows of 54”/137 cm to larger size bows of 64”/162,5 cm

Age: Teen to adult – smaller size bows of 64”/162,5 cm to larger size bows of 70”/177,8 cm

 

Draw Weight

This signifies the amount of force the archer needs to pull the bow. Draw weight is always measured in pounds although metrified countries may have added a kilogram translation. Sometimes the pound is written as a hashtag # sign on the labeling.

A recurve bow’s draw weight will increase as it is drawn but a compound bow’s weight will not.

A quick assessment of the learner’s body weight, gender, and general fitness levels help work out their draw weight capabilities. Keeping in mind that beginners always place lower draw weights.

Small child (70 to 100 pounds/31 to 45 kilograms) – 10 to 15 pounds/4,5 to 6,8 kilograms suggested draw weight.

Larger size child (100 to 130lbs/59 kilograms) – 15 to 25 pounds/11 kilograms suggested draw weight.

Petite female & medium size female – 25 to 35 pounds/15,8 kilograms suggested draw weight.

Small frame male – 30 to 45 pounds/ 13 to 20 kilograms suggested draw weight.

Medium frame male – 40 to 55 pounds/ 20 to 25 kilograms suggested draw weight.